katealexander01

Archive for October, 2009|Monthly archive page

Guggenheim at 50

In Manhattan on October 22, 2009 at 2:54 pm

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York is not alone in their Fiftieth  Anniversary celebration.

From the Guggenheim website:

Empire State Building Celebrates the Guggenheim
Thursday, October 22 @ 6:00 p.m.

At dusk on October 21, the Empire State Building will be lit Guggenheim red in honor of the museum’s 50th Anniversary. Also throughout October, the Empire State Building presents a dynamic time line of the building of the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Guggenheim Museum in the main entrance lobby.

Changes at The Frick

In Manhattan on October 13, 2009 at 1:41 pm

Just like any other home, historic houses and house museums require a bit of updating, home improvement, or remodeling every now and then. New York City’s Frick Collection recently completed a tedious refurbishment process for the Living Hall…which inevitably led to adjustments in the spaces around the Living Hall.

From The New York Times:

The first challenge was deciding where to hang those 1487 panels — “The Departure of the Argonauts” by Pietro del Donzello and “The Argonauts in Colchis” by Bartolomeo di Giovanni, scenes depicting the myth of Jason’s quest for the golden fleece. “It’s like a domino effect,” said Colin B. Bailey, the Frick’s chief curator, describing how he and Denise Allen, a Frick curator, moved two paintings to make room for the panels and then rethought the collection’s installation.

(…)

And that problem led to the reinstallation of works in the East Gallery, which has just undergone a gentle face-lift for the first time since 1945. Using a swatch of the room’s original wall fabric retrieved from the Frick’s archive as a reference point, researchers found a mohair wall covering that was close to the original shade of coral…

Continue reading

Museum Bookstores

In Museum Resources on October 8, 2009 at 1:21 pm

Rather than searching for art publications on Amazon, which prevents viewing loads of high-quality reproductions firsthand,  I suggest browsing the shelves of an art museum bookstore. Many of the world’s leading museums have art-related merchandise and resources available in their bookstores or gift shops. The following are just a few that New York has to offer:

From Time Out New York, New York’s Best: Art bookstores you can browse for free:

  • MoMA bookstore More than 2,000 books share space with art reproductions and design objects. 11 W 53rd St between Fifth and Sixth Aves, momastore.org
  • MoMA bookstore
    More than 2,000 books share space with art reproductions and design objects. 11 W 53rd St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-708-9700, momastore.org)
  • MoMA bookstore
    More than 2,000 books share space with art reproductions and design objects. 11 W 53rd St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-708-9700, momastore.org)
  • Click here for the full list

    A Day at the MoMA

    In Museum Resources on October 1, 2009 at 2:11 pm

    It is always fun and invigorating to visit temporary art exhibitions, but let’s not overlook the renown displays of works from permanent collections.

    Has it been a few years since you took a stroll through the permanent galleries at your favorite museum? Have you taken advantage of the visitor resources and programs available? Why not plan an museum excursion for the weekend, a lunch break, or to unwind after a chaotic day at work??? One of my favorite (and luckily local) museums is….

    The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

    The MoMA website makes it easy to plan your visit with everything from their hours and directions to advanced ticket purchases! They even provide a daily calendar to refer to if you find yourself with an empty block of time in your schedule.

    In order to make the most of your visit, especially if your time is limited and you’re not sure what is on view, I suggest checking out the collections beforehand. If you are super organized, you may want to coordinate your list of must-see exhibits with the map of the galleries.

    Most importantly, enjoy!