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Posts Tagged ‘art exhibition’

New Museum Exhibition

In Manhattan on November 5, 2009 at 10:03 am

Urs Fischer + 3 floors of the New Museum =

Marguerite de Ponty

From The New York Times:

…these pieces have seemed to signal the end of installation art, like monochrome paintings sometimes seem to forewarn the end of painting. Add nothing, just use the space and the architecture, dummy. Boom.

The New Museum, seeking some heat of its own, has given Mr. Fischer the run of nearly all the exhibition space — three full floors — in its two-year-old building. It’s a smart move, even if those hoping for a sizable new aperture in one of the museum’s surfaces will be disappointed. The exhibition, titled “Urs Fischer: Marguerite de Ponty” (the subtitle referring to a character from the Symbolist poet Mallarmé), has been supervised by Massimiliano Gioni, a New Museum curator.

In the trifecta of sculpture surveys at major New York museums this fall — expect Roni Horn at the Whitney next week and Gabriel Orozco at the Museum of Modern Art in December — Mr. Fischer’s show started in the lead, with the most anticipation. It felt premature, presumptuous and unpredictable, even though Mr. Fischer, who was born in Switzerland in 1973, descends from a line of German-speaking bad boys that includes Sigmar Polke and Martin Kippenberger and that has been one of the strongest strains of postwar art. Anything could happen, the thinking went, given Mr. Fischer’s capricious, encompassing and, at best, fearless conception of sculpture…

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Georgia O’Keefe: Abstraction

In Uncategorized on September 21, 2009 at 2:11 pm

A new exhibition opened last week at the Whitney Museum of American Art.  Georgia O’Keeffe: Abstraction features over 130 pieces by O’Keeffe and some photographs taken by her lover Alfred Stieglitz.

According to the O’Keeffe exhibition review by the New York Times, “There are two Georgia O’Keeffes. They’re closely related, but one is far more interesting than the other. Not so interesting, except maybe as a marketing phenomenon, is the post-1930s cow-skull painter and striker of frontier-priestess poses.”

While I haven’t seen the exhibition, I am pretty excited about it.  I always love to see great shows by monumental historic artists (like O’Keeffe), because I often get a much deeper appreciation that I previously had – one clouded with too many images from dorm room wall posters and coffee table books.  I’m also hoping for dear life that the exhibition is far far far better than the abysmal Lifetime movie I saw this weekend about the love affair between Stieglitz and O’Keeffe.

The Queens Museum takes on the Recession

In Uncategorized on July 10, 2009 at 5:54 pm
Curator Larissa Harris with the "Red Lines" installation on the panorama at the Queens Museum. Photo courtesy of the New York Times

Curator Larissa Harris with the "Red Lines" installation on the panorama at the Queens Museum. Photo courtesy of the New York Times

The Recession has of course been hitting the museum world very hard, but not too many museums are drawing attention to the economic hardships we are all suffering. But artist Damon Rich has made the housing foreclosures the subject of an exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art, called “the Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center.” Using photographs, installation, sculpture, drawings and models, Rich gives a visual narrative to the current economic crisis, as well as the history of economic hardship in America, going back to the depression.

The artist even made use of the museum’s large panorama of the five boroughs to map out the neighborhoods effected by foreclosures in our own backyard. The museum bought about 2,000 of those plastic thingies that come in pizza boxes to keep the cheese from sticking to the box, painted them pink and used them to mark city blocks that have had three or more foreclosures on the block. The visual break down really opens up your eyes to who is getting hit the hardest by the economy: poorer neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens seem to be infested by the pink markers, while in Manhattan, there are a whopping two blocks marked pink.

Some would say art has a social responsibility, and that is exactly what Damon Rich is doing at the Queens Museum. You can learn more about the exhibition, which is open until September 27, by clicking here.

Upcoming “sexy” show at MoMA

In Uncategorized on June 18, 2009 at 4:22 pm

When people think of Surrealism they usually think of Magritte’s men in bowler hats or Dalí’s melting clocks, but the Surrealists were also active in the third dimension as well. Opening this coming week is a MoMA exhibition that focuses on the sexual themes of Surrealist sculpture. Sculpture allowed the artists an imaginative foray into the sensuality of art, and they took full advantage of the medium: don’t you just want to rub that Meret Oppenheim fur-lined saucer on your cheek? Here’s a tidbit about the show (June 24, 2009 – January 4, 2010) from their website:

Surrealist artists, writers, and poets placed persistent emphasis on the power of the imagination to transform the everyday. Beginning in the early 1930s, the production of elliptically erotic, sexually charged objects and sculptures became central to their concerns. This exhibition features some of the most notorious works, including Salvador Dalí’s bread-and-inkwell-crownedRetrospective Bust of a Woman (1933) and Meret Oppenheim’s fur-lined teacup (1936).

Meret Oppenheim. Object. 1936. Fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, cup 4 3/8" (10.9 cm) in diameter; saucer 9 3/8" (23.7 cm) in diameter; spoon 8" (20.2 cm) long, overall height 2 7/8" (7.3 cm). Purchase. © 2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Pro Litteris, Zurich

Meret Oppenheim. Object. 1936. Fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, cup 4 3/8" (10.9 cm) in diameter; saucer 9 3/8" (23.7 cm) in diameter; spoon 8" (20.2 cm) long, overall height 2 7/8" (7.3 cm). Purchase. © 2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Pro Litteris, Zurich